comment on this article

KEMET introduces next-generation automotive supercapacitors

KEMET has announced new high-performance supercapacitors for automotive electronics, the FMD and FU0H series.

These series deliver 1,000 hours at 85°C/85% RH-rated voltage and operational temperature ranging from -40°C to 85°C. The FMD series offers up to 4,000 hours.

Both series are qualified to an automotive testing protocol and are manufactured in an ISO TS 16949 certified plant and are subjected to PPAP/PSW and change control. They are intended for automotive applications needing a main power system backup during a power loss, such as ADAS, autonomous vehicles, and central gateway ECUs.

Supercapacitors are suitable for maintaining the main power system’s real-time clock or volatile memory when it is removed, such as during a power failure or when the main power system’s battery has been removed for replacement. Additionally, these supercapacitors offer power backup in equipment ranging from IoT devices, smart meters, medical devices, and industrial computing.

Using supercapacitors for automotive electronics enables greater design freedom and their benign open-circuit failure mode contrasts with typical short-circuit battery failures that may result in outgassing or ignition. Furthermore, supercapacitors are a cost-effective alternative to small backup batteries. Depending on the type of load and current demand, they can store enough energy to provide backup for durations ranging from a few seconds to several hours.

KEMET’s miniature supercapacitors use a proprietary aqueous electrolyte solution that provides high durability against liquid leakage, vibrations, and thermal shock, thus high reliability in harsh environments.

Aqueous electrolytes are highly conductive, have a low environmental impact, and are non-toxic and non-flammable.

Unlike a battery, supercapacitors store and release energy quickly through physical adsorption and the ions desorption in the electrolyte between its electrodes. With their low internal resistance, these devices can fully charge within a few seconds. In contrast, a secondary battery cell can take from ten minutes to several hours to fully charge.

In addition there is no theoretical limit to the life cycle, whereas a lithium-ion secondary cell has a finite lifetime of about 500 cycles. They also typically have a greater resistance to moisture absorption than organic compounds, resulting in a longer life with better stability.

Author
Neil Tyler

Comment on this article


This material is protected by MA Business copyright See Terms and Conditions. One-off usage is permitted but bulk copying is not. For multiple copies contact the sales team.

What you think about this article:

Size, energy-density and cost ? Is it still not cost-effective to connect together,say, 50-100 of them in slimline modules to use for eg. EV regen-braking, assisting/boosting acceleration(esp. from standstill, 0-5 mph ?) general load-levelling/sharing with an EV's battery pack ?
Paul G


Posted by: Paul Govan, 01/09/2021

Add your comments

Name
 
Email
 
Comments
 

Your comments/feedback may be edited prior to publishing. Not all entries will be published.
Please view our Terms and Conditions before leaving a comment.

Related Articles

GaN technology

Texas Instruments (TI) has said that its gallium nitride (GaN) technology and ...

Flyback Switcher ICs

Power Integrations has introduced the InnoSwitch3-PD family of ICs, a highly ...

Get to market faster

A quick look at using Vicor's PFM and AIM in VIA packaging for your AC to Point ...