Medical

Developments in medical systems are helping to diagnose and treat more conditions than ever before, with devices ranging from blood pressure meters and glucosometers to leading edge MRI machines. It’s no surprise that medical electronics is a demanding discipline, which means companies involved in the sector, as well as those looking to enter the medical electronics supply chain, need to keep up to date.

New Electronics covers developments in the medical electronics sector, bringing technology updates and opinion from the market.

Fast becoming a fully-fledged industry

As various authorities around the world have granted companies the right to operate drones in a number of markets – from agriculture and construction to insurance – the range and variety of applications has grown substantially over the past five years.

The rise of surgical robotics

Medical robotics first appeared over 30 years ago and they were developed in response to perceived weaknesses associated with the use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) technologies

Living with lithium

Batteries play a key role in a range of applications and are used in medical devices for increased safety of operation and for having the freedom to move instruments around in hospitals.

Measuring health

The latest generation of health sensing wearables won’t just simply measure input, they’ll enable accurate, credible and safe data that will not only help doctors but usher in an age of wearable, regulated medical devices.

Communication in Fieldbus and Industrial Ethernet standards LAPP industrial cables

As the production lines develop and become increasingly complex, the number of devices (sensors and actuators) that need to be managed also grows. Industrial processes are carried out by PLCs and extensive networks of digital or analogue connections. Most often, these are systems based on electric (copper) or fibre-optic cables. Depending on the age of the infrastructure, these will be FIELDBUS (older) or ETHERNET (newer) systems

How AI is transforming the NHS

Whether being used to discover links between genetic codes, power surgical robots or maximise hospital efficiency, artificial intelligence (AI) is transforming the healthcare industry. By Tom Austin-Morgan.

Keeping it clean

Wearable medical devices allow people more control over their own health by letting them monitor themselves

A touch-free world

Optical sensors are being used to help create a safer, touch-free world as a result of COVID, as Gabriele Fulco explains to New Electronics.

A brighter tomorrow?

While the COVID-19 pandemic has yet to fully play-out, it’s had a profound impact on how we work, play and rest. New Electronics takes a look at the technologies that could drive change going forward.

Navigating Covid-19

“It’s almost Darwinian out there”, according to one CEO who spoke to New Electronics and, with the impact of Covid-19 yet to be fully played out, it’s likely that only those companies that are able to adapt to the changes brought about by the pandemic and the challenges of recession that will be the ones to survive.

Delivering support for care homes

Well before the Covid-19 crisis the care home sector in the UK, as well as elsewhere in the world, had been approaching what many described as a ‘perfect storm’ caused by a combination of issues such as rising costs, increased demand and reduced funding.

AI set to transform healthcare

The use of artificial intelligence (AI), including machine learning (ML) and deep learning techniques (DL), is poised to become a transformational force in healthcare.

Battery health & safety

Lithium-ion batteries are popular because they have a number of important advantages.They’re lighter when compared to other types of rechargeable battery and lithium, being highly reactive, can store a lot of energy in its atomic bonds.

Squeezing every drop!

The Internet of Things (IoT), Industry 4.0, digital health and greater prevalence of wearable electronics all rely heavily on the use of sensing devices that it simply won’t be practical to plug into a mains socket.

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