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Fundamental physics collaboration

A leading academic team from Heriot-Watt University is partnering with ASML, a major supplier to the semiconductor industry, in a move designed to drive advances in new light source technologies.

In a five-year collaboration partly funded by ASML, Professor John Travers’ research into fundamental physics will be accelerated, creating a direct route from lab to market for new laser technologies.

The partnership highlights Heriot-Watt University’s ongoing success in attracting industry collaborations and overseas investment into its leading-edge academic research.

ASML is among the world’s leading manufacturers of semiconductor lithography machines. Based in the Netherlands, it uses light to print tiny patterns onto silicon, resulting in the mass production of semiconductor chips. Precision is key to the printing technique. Optical metrology also uses light to establish the exact measurements required. Developments in this field allow top chipmakers to create better performing, cheaper chips.

Due to the value of each multimillion machine, ASML said that it was committed to continuing to explore new directions for its technology to take.

The partnership sees a new laboratory at Heriot-Watt University which will accelerate the industrialisation of fundamental physics research. Professor Travers’ current focus is on new broad bandwidth light sources for optical metrology. The sensors in ASML’s machines must work at multiple wavelengths because they encounter various materials, each of which absorb in different ways.

Commenting on the announcement Professor Travers said, “The type of optical components used in recent research previously sat in the domain of fundamental physics research. Working in close cooperation with ASML is rapidly moving our work in the direction of the industrialisation of this technology, where we are addressing specific engineering challenges, and applying the technique to create real-world impact.

“My research into fundamental physics can be used by ASML in an industry setting. So often in academia, the focus is on advancing the science and impressing our peers. However, through this industrial partnership, we are addressing specific real-world engineering challenges, with industry and academia learning from each other.”

Application of the advances in light source technologies are not limited to semiconductor chip manufacture, as there are also valuable uses for the technique in healthcare technology and precision manufacturing.

Hein Otto Folkerts, vice-president within Development and Engineering at ASML, said, “ASML has a long tradition of close partnerships with academia. Our collaboration with Professor Travers and Heriot-Watt University will complement ASML’s research agenda, supporting our technology roadmap. This group at Heriot-Watt is one of the leading groups in the world working on these kind of light sources and has a track record on innovations.”


Author
Neil Tyler

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