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NXP releases Wi-Fi 6E Tri-Band chipset for access devices

NXP Semiconductors has unveiled the CW641 Wi-Fi 6E Tri-Band system-on-chip (SoC), laying the foundation for a new era of Wi-Fi 6 devices that can operate in the 6GHz band.

With increasing congestion in the legacy 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands, the US FCC has approved 1.2GHz of unlicensed spectrum for the 6GHz band along with other regions around the world, which will help to transform the Wi-Fi landscape.

NXP is introducing a Wi-Fi 6E device that will make use of this 6GHz band and extend Wi-Fi capacity by bringing higher throughout, increased capacity, reliability, and improved latency.

Designed for access points and service provider gateways, the CW641 unlocks increased speeds of over 4Gbps and multi-user performance in the new 6 GHz band, providing greater capacity and lower latency, improving the Wi-Fi user experience. Adding 6GHz capabilities to gateway platforms gives service providers options to efficiently partition available bandwidth across devices to ensure optimum user experience for a wide range of applications.

Mission critical, high bandwidth, low latency applications like mesh back haul and cloud gaming are suitable for migration to 6GHz, freeing up the 5GHz and 2.4 GHz bands for other lower bandwidth applications.

Beyond access point applications, the CW641 SoC will enable high performance Wi-Fi 6E applications across consumer, automotive, industrial, and Internet of Things (IoT).

“NXP’s Wi-Fi 6E chipset combines multi-gigabyte data rates, low latency, and higher multi-user performance to deliver on customer demands for 6GHz products that address the decade-long need for the greater capacity required in today’s wireless networking applications,” said Larry Olivas, Head of Marketing for NXP’s Wireless Connectivity Solutions. “Our new chipset makes it possible to take advantage of this new uncongested bandwidth, which will provide increased performance with less interference for devices on the Wi-Fi 6E network.”

“The increased availability of unlicensed 6 GHz spectrum for Wi-Fi is the most exciting and transformative change to the Wi-Fi landscape in recent times, bringing about much higher throughput, greater capacity, increased reliability, and improved quality of service, all of which will help enable new wireless services while addressing key challenges currently facing the technology,” said Andrew Zignani, Principal Analyst at ABI Research. “Solutions such as NXP’s latest CW641 Wi-Fi 6E chipset will play a fundamental role in enabling the 6 GHz infrastructure rollout, allowing a varied ecosystem of end devices, applications and services to take advantage of this enormous new opportunity for Wi-Fi.”

Author
Neil Tyler

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