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Epishine signs distribution agreement with Farnell

Epishine, the Swedish manufacturer of printed organic solar cells and development kits has signed a new franchise agreement with Farnell.

The new-to-market printed organic solar cells are optimised for harvesting energy from indoor, low energy lighting enabling organic solar power to be used everywhere. Design engineers can utilise this new technology with Epishine’s Light Energy Harvesting Evaluation Kit. Farnell is the first high service distributor to stock products from Epishine.

Epishine’s organic solar cells are small, thin, flexible, and printed on recyclable plastic. The cells can be easily integrated into any low power electronic equipment where they convert ambient indoor light into electricity. New product designers can replace batteries in wireless sensors and similar devices with the organic solar cells, reducing the environmental impact of battery waste and saving battery replacement costs.

The Light Energy Harvesting Evaluation Kit (EK01LEH3_6) has been developed to demonstrate how Epishine’s Light Energy Harvesting (LEH) modules can power indoor wireless low-power devices that are usually powered by batteries.

The kit combines a 6-cell 50x50mm LEH module with a supercapacitor which acts as an energy buffer and intelligent charging management system to support various output voltages and energy storage solutions. It can even use an external primary battery as a backup. The evaluation kit can deliver sufficient output current to power most low-power wireless devices such as BLE, Zigbee and LoRa.

The ability to programme the evaluation kit provides added flexibility and showcases the unique product integration and design possibilities of Epishine’s LEH modules.

Commenting Niklas Forsgren, Product Integration Manager, Epishine said, “Epishine sees great value in offering our evaluation kit within Farnell’s huge network, giving the market the possibility to evaluate this exciting technology. The evaluation kit is easy to use so you can quickly connect your device and see if it can run on light only.”

Author
Neil Tyler

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