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Flex Power Modules launches DC/DC advanced bus converter

Flex Power Modules has launched the BMR480, a DC/DC advanced bus converter that targets high-end and high-power applications and can handle 1000W of power and 96.2A of peak current.

In an industry-standard and low-profile quarter-brick-format with dimensions of 58.4 x 36.8 x 12.19mm (2.30 x 1.45 x 0.48 inches), the BMR480 operates from a wide 40V to 60V input voltage range and offers multiple tightly regulated (+/-2.5%) pre-programmed outputs at 10.4V, 12V and 12.5V but can be factory configured at any voltage between 9V-13.2V.

The module employs Flex’s Hybrid Regulated Ratio (HRR) technology, which enables better utilisation of the powertrain to deliver high-power conversion across its wide input voltage range. In addition, delivering exemplary performance for applications that operate in high ambient temperatures with limited airflow, the module offers power conversion of up to 97% efficiency – at 53V and half load – while also keeping power losses low.

As well as being suitable for intermediate bus conversion (IBC), dynamic bus voltage (DBV) and distributed power architectures (DPA), the power module has been designed to power high-end and high-power applications powered by multi-cell batteries or rectifiers that are commonly used in ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) applications. Other market sectors include networking and telecommunications equipment, industrial equipment, and server and storage applications.

Although the module comes with a standard baseplate, it can also be connected to a heatsink or coldplate for the most extremely challenging thermal environments.

Key features for power designers and power system architects include dynamic load compensation and support for the latest version (v1.3) of the PMBus communication specification and the Ericsson Power Designer software tool. Other product features of the BMR480 include droop load sharing capability, 1500V input/output isolation, monotonic start-up, remote control, and a range of protection capabilities including over-temperature, output-short-circuit and output-over-voltage.

Author
Neil Tyler

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