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Whitepapers Filtered by - Aerospace

Adapting to the extremes of rugged design

Ruggedisation and reliability are key requirements for a wide range of embedded computing markets, including industrial, medical, airplane or railway applications. Reliable operation is particularly important for safety-critical applications such as avionics and railway control. To meet the needs of these markets, embedded developers must carefully consider issues including hardware selection, manufacturing and testing methodologies, and software design. In this article we will explore these areas and show how embedded developers can build rugged systems with minimal cost and effort.

The real solution to fake parts

The high tech supply chain is more vulnerable to counterfeit components than ever before. With increasingly sophisticated criminal, the only way to protect the supply chain is through tool, technology, and new thinking about industrial aftermarkets. This white paper from Verical looks at securing supply chains through data transparency and better market design.

Pilatus PC-21- the ideal trainer aircraft for the 21st century

Imagine a new type of trainer aircraft for the twenty-first century. One that adapts to a student's requirements, transforming its' console to match that of the type of aircraft the training calls for. Read how Pilatus Aircraft Ltd., with Curtiss-Wright Controls, has made this ideal new teaching platform a reality.

Express Logic and Ball Aerospace team up to provide embedded real time software for NASA's 'Deep Impact' space mission.

On January 12, 2005, NASA, working with the engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of Maryland, launched Deep Impact’s two piece space probe with the intention of hitting Tempel 1—a comet 80 million miles away. To complete the $300million project, JPL went to long time hardware provider Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp, specifically tasking Ball with building an 820-pound craft approximately the size of an SUV. The project consisted of a Flyby craft and an impactor craft, which was responsible for taking and transmitting the data back to earth. These imaging instruments were also required to aid in the autonomous navigation of the crafts as well.

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