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Liquid-in-liquid 3D printed structures

Scientists from the US Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a way to 3D print structures composed entirely of liquids. They envision their all-liquid material could be used to construct liquid electronics that power flexible, stretchable devices.

‘Fully functional’ circuits can be 3D printed in single process

Researchers at the University of Nottingham have pioneered a breakthrough method to 3D print fully functional electronic circuits. The circuits, which contain electrically-conductive metallic inks and insulating polymeric inks, can now be produced in a single printing process in which UV light solidifies the inks.

Solid state battery targets IIoT applications

Battery pioneer Ilika Technologies has launched what it says is the first solid state device designed for use in hostile environments. The P180, the second member of the Stereax family, is suitable for applications which operate in temperatures ranging from -40 to 150°C.

Making batteries from waste glass bottles

Nanosilicon anodes for high performance lithium-ion batteries have been created by researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering, using waste glass bottles and a low cost chemical process.

Arduino-based liquid level sensing hardware

SST Sensing has partnered with Sparkfun to develop a simple to implement solution for single point liquid detection using infrared technology. The solution comprises an Optomax Digital liquid level switch which is connected to an Arduino board via the TTL output and powered by a 5V source.

Metallic hydrogen for room temperature semiconductors

Nearly a century after it was theorised, Harvard scientists have succeeded in creating atomic metallic hydrogen. In addition to helping scientists answer fundamental questions about the nature of matter, the material could have a range of applications, including as a room temperature superconductor.

Electronic properties found in boron chains

A Rice University team that simulated one-dimensional forms of boron is said to have found they possess unique properties. If the metallic ribbons of boron are stretched, they morph into antiferromagnetic semiconducting chains, and when released they fold back into ribbons.

Dark lattice modes used to create laser light

A plasmonic nanolaser that operates at visible light frequencies and uses dark lattice modes has been made by researchers at Aalto University, Finland. The results are said to open new prospects for on chip coherent light sources.

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