Technology Filtered by - Embedded & System Power

New Electronics strives to bring you all the latest technology news from the Embedded & System Power sector. Advances in electronics are often fast-paced and innovative, so we know that as a design engineer you want to be kept up-to-date with current developments.

Below is a comprehensive list of all the latest electronics technology news from New Electronics.

Will the attractions of embedded FPGA overcome traditional cost objections and finally see accelerated growth?

Twenty years ago, it looked like a concept that was ready for primetime: putting programmable logic inside ASICs and SoCs. At the time, the move seemed inevitable. ASIC mask prices were rising fast, driven by the need to pull more and more from a bag of optical tricks to keep Moore’s Law on track. The cost of respins alone seemed enough to persuade designers to leave some reprogrammable “sewing kits” in their SoCs to let them iron out bugs after tapeout instead of committing tens of thousands of dollars more to the project to get some new masks.

Measuring battery life

Poor battery life is affecting the take-up of too many devices. How can power be analysed in enough detail to ensure products live up to consumer expectations?

Design a switch mode power supply using an isolated flyback topology

Here, Rich Miron, Applications Engineer at Digi-Key Electronics explores the operation of switch mode power supplies and explores make Vs. buy decision process for power supplies. Miron also investigates the design of a single output supply utilising flyback topology and provides a sample design using readily available parts and components.

A better approach to engineering study?

While Hereford University of Technology and Engineering will be the first new university to open in Britain in 30 years, crucially it’s looking to provide a dramatically different approach to studying engineering.

Flash storage in networking infrastructure needs to focus on reliability, quality and data retentions

The infrastructure to support and grow connectivity is constantly evolving, and encompasses telecommunications, data communications and data centres. The processing and storage applications in that infrastructure stretches from base stations to subscriber lines, through a hierarchy of routers and switches. As the amount of digital traffic continues to expand, the need for fast and reliable storage only increases.

Beyond the threshold

Given the massive spikes in power consumption incurred by microprocessors and memory when they ramp up to top speed, it is no surprise that much of the attention in circuit design is aimed at trying to find ways to keep digital power under control.

It’s Time to Overdesign for Flexibility - Don’t Let the IIoT Catch You With Your Head in the Sand

Tired of the countless articles talking about the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)? Surely all of the pundits, industry-leading companies, and technology providers excited to share their perspective on the growing impact of the IIoT have exhausted the topic. Instead of focusing on what the IIoT is, this article takes the opposite approach and talks about what the IIoT isn’t. Let’s be honest, the IIoT isn’t defined. It isn’t a known target with a clear set of parameters and rules. But there’s one thing we do know—as we build and define the IIoT, it’s critical that providers overdesign their technology offerings for flexibility.

Powering industry change

Over the last decade or so, the semiconductor content of cars has increased dramatically; not only in terms of value, but also in terms of the number of components being deployed.

Snapdragon processors for embedded systems

Since its establishment in 1985, Qualcomm has been involved in the mobile communications market, although its Qualcomm Technologies arm has made forays into other areas, such as MEMs based displays and wireless vehicle charging.

Computational graphs to cut power consumption

For Professor Veljko Milutinovic of the University of Belgrade, computing stands on the edge of major change and it is one that was predicted by physicist Richard Feynman because of the way computing uses energy. In his lecture notes on computation written in the early 1980s – but not published until eight years after his death in 1988 – Feynman argued that computing itself at its limit could incur practically no energy and that all the power would instead go into computation.

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