Power

Power electronics is a key element in the world of electronic design and engineering and electronic engineers need to have a thorough understanding of this area if they’re going to create successful products.

In this section, New Electronics keeps designers up to date with the latest developments in the power electronics market – everything from DC/DC converters to IGBTs to battery technology. In fact, New Electronics covers any power product that can go on a PCB.

A flexible design process

Delivering a successful product from the ground-up in 14 short months requires a hardworking team, especially when that team is made up of 90 engineers located around the globe.

System success

“Software-defined testers will be critical in keeping up with the evolution in automotive design,” said Jeff Phillips, Head of Automotive Marketing at National Instruments (NI) in an interview with New Electronics last year.

Innovation unbound

Earlier this month the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) took place in Las Vegas, and with over 4,500 exhibitors and upwards of 180,000 visitors it remains the largest consumer electronics show in the US, with a global impact to match.

Digital dilemma

As the amount of data soars and computational power accelerates, data centres are set to have a bigger carbon footprint than the aviation industry. What can be done to address this?

Can a transient effect rescue silicon power scaling?

The war with semiconductor physics claimed another victim at the end of August when GlobalFoundries decided it could no longer afford to continue work on a 7nm finFET process, or its successors, despite the efforts of teams that came originally from AMD and IBM. With deeper pockets, Intel, Samsung and TSMC are continuing but at some point even they will either run out of nanometres or the belief that they will find enough customers to pay for increasingly expensive wafers that may not justify the scaling benefit they achieve.

Will the attractions of embedded FPGA overcome traditional cost objections and finally see accelerated growth?

Twenty years ago, it looked like a concept that was ready for primetime: putting programmable logic inside ASICs and SoCs. At the time, the move seemed inevitable. ASIC mask prices were rising fast, driven by the need to pull more and more from a bag of optical tricks to keep Moore’s Law on track. The cost of respins alone seemed enough to persuade designers to leave some reprogrammable “sewing kits” in their SoCs to let them iron out bugs after tapeout instead of committing tens of thousands of dollars more to the project to get some new masks.

Measuring battery life

Poor battery life is affecting the take-up of too many devices. How can power be analysed in enough detail to ensure products live up to consumer expectations?

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