Developments in medical systems are helping to diagnose and treat more conditions than ever before, with devices ranging from blood pressure meters and glucosometers to leading edge MRI machines. It’s no surprise that medical electronics is a demanding discipline, which means companies involved in the sector, as well as those looking to enter the medical electronics supply chain, need to keep up to date.

New Electronics covers developments in the medical electronics sector, bringing technology updates and opinion from the market.

Bioelectronics and biosciences could replace the drug industry as we know it

From bioelectronics to biosciences, the pace of change in life sciences is accelerating as companies look to microfluidics, micro- and nanotechnology to develop innovative medical treatments. Earlier this year, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) announced that it was a forming a bioelectronics firm with Verily Life Sciences, a subsidiary of Alphabet. The new company will research, develop and commercialise bioelectronics medicine, a relatively new scientific field in which miniaturised, implantable devices could treat illnesses ranging from bowel disease to arthritis, hypertension and diabetes.

What is the difference between FDM and Polyjet 3D printing technology?

Whether you’re buying your first 3D printer or upgrading from one you’ve been running for years, it's important to understand the differences between the two leading printing technologies. Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) and Polyjet each build 3D models layer by layer, but while the process by which they do this differs greatly, the one you choose to buy will likely be determined less by the technology itself than by the kind of models or tools you need for production.

Half-bridge motor drivers save time

A family of NovalithIC components from Infineon integrates the control chip and MOSFETs into a single component. Rutronik expects this to bring a new level of performance to integrated and protected motor drivers.

Catalyst brings together engineers and researchers in Northern Ireland

The Northern Ireland Science Park, recently rebranded Catalyst, brings together engineers and researchers to create a community of innovators. The Northern Ireland Science Park is seen by many as an unqualified success for the Northern Ireland economy. Recently rebranded Catalyst, new plans have been unveiled with the aim of investing a further£100million to drive innovation and technology to support growth in the region.

Data centre interconnect drives optical module advances

The huge growth in demand for video, cloud services and social networking is changing almost everything about the way the networks are built and used, not least the interconnect technologies within data centres and the ‘top of rack’ network switches that shift packets between the optical internet boxes – or Data Centre Interconnect (DCI) – and the servers that store and process the data.

Intel’s Programmable Systems Group takes its first step towards an FPGA based system in package portfolio

Speaking in 2012, Danny Biran – then Altera’s senior VP for corporate strategy – said he saw a time when the company would be offering ‘standard products’ – devices featuring an FPGA, with different dice integrated in the package. “It’s also possible these devices may integrate customer specific circuits if the business case is good enough,” he noted.

Irish company pioneers the development of 94GHz RF circuits for a range of applications

It wasn’t too long ago that GHz frequencies were regarded as exotic; few applications took advantage of that part of the spectrum as technology was not only difficult, but also expensive. That meant that military dominated the few applications there were. The Brimstone missile is believed to use 94GHz technology for targeting purposes, rather than the lasers used in previous missiles.

The Brexit debate: should we get out or ‘remain, reform and revitalise’

Could the UK pulling out of the European Union pose as big a threat to the global economy as a ‘hard landing’ in China? That was the claim made recently by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) chief economist Catherine Mann. According to Mann, a vote to leave the EU will not only impact the UK, but would also have a significant impact on the global economy.

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