Industrial

Electronics underpins many industrial systems; with applications ranging from programmable logic controllers to sensors to communications. But the market has its particular requirements, including reliability and immunity to the often hostile environment. This means companies involved in the sector, as well as those looking to supply products to those building industrial applications, need to keep up to date.

New Electronics covers developments in the industrial electronics sector, bringing technology updates and opinion from the market.

Connectivity to enable the trusted digital enterprise

Manufacturing industry is on the cusp of a 4th wave of transformation that holds the promise of a step change in productivity. Industrial IoT business models are being defined with increased flexibility, co-operative human-machine interaction and the use of data analytics to identify trends and dynamic system relationships that were previously hidden or inaccessible.

New technology to impact on future liability

Defective products or work represent the largest cause of liability loss for businesses, accounting for 43% of the value of all claims in the UK. The average value of such claims is in excess of £312,000, with the cost of product recalls a major factor.

Bringing LED solutions to market

Although it’s 15 years since LED lighting made its debut, take-up is accelerating across all areas of lighting, helped by its lower power consumption, longer lifespan, increased robustness and faster switching capabilities.

Potential breakthroughs in battery technology

The pressure on those developing new battery chemistries is increasing as consumers demand the ability to use their electronic devices for longer between charges. And it seems that researchers are responding with a range of potential solutions, not only based on lithium, but also exploring other elements. Beyond that, solid state electrolytes are beginning to show promise.

What’s the best way to work out a system architecture?

The emergence of the Internet of Things has also seen the emergence of a string of start ups which have, in their opinions, good ideas for IoT products, but who lack the technical expertise that would allow them to get those ideas to market. One way for those companies to move forward is to work with a design consultancy; an organisation which, if necessary, can take that idea from the quintessential ‘back of the envelope’ all the way to manufacturing. But what does the consultant do when confronted with the germ of an idea?

Extending operating life through better power system architectures

Consumer demand for wearable technology is set to explode. Analyst firm Gartner estimates that, by the end of 2017, annual shipments of wearable devices will have exceeded 320million units, with revenues of $35billion. It is likely that smart watches and fitness monitoring systems, such as sports watches and wrist bands, will represent at least 60% of this total.

Novel navigational approach to product development

The risks and pitfalls of bringing a product to market on time and within budget are legion yet, as the IoT helps to lower the barriers associated with the deployment of new technology, a growing number of start-ups are looking to take their ideas to market.

Snapdragon processors for embedded systems

Since its establishment in 1985, Qualcomm has been involved in the mobile communications market, although its Qualcomm Technologies arm has made forays into other areas, such as MEMs based displays and wireless vehicle charging.

Computational graphs to cut power consumption

For Professor Veljko Milutinovic of the University of Belgrade, computing stands on the edge of major change and it is one that was predicted by physicist Richard Feynman because of the way computing uses energy. In his lecture notes on computation written in the early 1980s – but not published until eight years after his death in 1988 – Feynman argued that computing itself at its limit could incur practically no energy and that all the power would instead go into computation.

Cooling atoms to almost absolute zero

Atoms generally whizz around with very high levels of energy – and it is this degree of activity that allows us to use the concept of temperature. When atoms have very low energy levels, they move much more slowly and we equate this to a very low temperature. Extrapolating, atoms stop moving at absolute zero.

Low cost solutions for managing enterprise content

Up to 80% of a company’s document information can be contained in different or separate formats – such as Word, Excel, pdf and AutoCAD – according to Jurate Venskeviciute-Buciene, chief marketing officer at DocLogix, a specialist in document and process management.

Graphene biosensors - finally a commercial reality

Nanomedical Diagnostics, a biotech company located in San Diego, California, has developed a breakthrough electronic assay, an investigative procedure that is usually used in medicine, pharmacology and molecular biology to assess or measure the presence of a particular entity.

High performance GUIs to improve wearable devices

High-end wearable devices such as smart watches are characterised by a rich functionality, a sophisticated graphical user interface (GUI) with touch operation and communication interfaces to a smartphone, tablet or PC – but also by extremely short battery life times.

Powerful telescopes bring us closer to the Big Bang

Humankind has always wondered what secrets the universe was hiding in its starry depths and striven to understand how we fit into the bigger picture. This curiosity is still strong, as demonstrated by the number of powerful telescopes that have either been built recently or are under construction.

Standards to unlock smart automotive potential

The automotive industry is going through some significant changes at the minute, with electric and connected vehicles already on the road. Meanwhile, autonomous vehicles are being tested across the globe and will, potentially, enter the mainstream in just a few years.

Pushing performance for VPX boards

FPGA technology has seen a significant change in the last two decades. From relatively simple devices used mainly as glue logic and for last minute board fixes, FPGAs have evolved into highly complex parts.

Is industry ready for 5G?

Just less than a month ago, the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, used his budget speech to make a case for 5G, the next-generation mobile technology, and promised to invest £16million in a series of trials and to support research into the development of technology to underpin its deployment.

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