Technology Filtered by - ASIC/SoC

New Electronics strives to bring you all the latest technology news from the ASIC/SoC sector. Advances in electronics are often fast-paced and innovative, so we know that as a design engineer you want to be kept up-to-date with current developments.

Below is a comprehensive list of all the latest electronics technology news from New Electronics.

Will the attractions of embedded FPGA overcome traditional cost objections and finally see accelerated growth?

Twenty years ago, it looked like a concept that was ready for primetime: putting programmable logic inside ASICs and SoCs. At the time, the move seemed inevitable. ASIC mask prices were rising fast, driven by the need to pull more and more from a bag of optical tricks to keep Moore’s Law on track. The cost of respins alone seemed enough to persuade designers to leave some reprogrammable “sewing kits” in their SoCs to let them iron out bugs after tapeout instead of committing tens of thousands of dollars more to the project to get some new masks.

Measuring battery life

Poor battery life is affecting the take-up of too many devices. How can power be analysed in enough detail to ensure products live up to consumer expectations?

Tackling congestion on programmable devices

Now more than 30 years old, the field-programmable gate array has evolved from a glue-logic device that made it possible to customise boards easily to a complete configurable system-on-chip (SoC). Hardwired 64bit processors, digital signal processing (DSP) engines and dedicated memory arrays have helped overcome the FPGAs density handicap versus fully custom silicon even for projects that expect to move into high volume.

Enabling the adaptable world

The intelligent connected world needs adaptable accelerated computing. As a result, more engineers are turning to FPGA as a Service providers via the cloud.

Pushing performance for VPX boards

FPGA technology has seen a significant change in the last two decades. From relatively simple devices used mainly as glue logic and for last minute board fixes, FPGAs have evolved into highly complex parts.

Using FPGAs in embedded systems

While there’s nothing new about the use of FPGAs in electronics products, many engineers are only just beginning to explore how the devices could help to improve their designs.

Technology to integrate FPGA functionality into SoCs

FPGAs are rarely out of the news, but the acquisition of Altera by Intel in 2015 pushed the technology firmly into the headlines. Intel’s main reason for buying Altera was to provide a way to accelerate the performance of its Xeon processors, used widely in data centres. But Intel hasn’t been the only company turning its attention to the use of FPGAs in such applications; earlier in 2015, Microsoft said that Project Catapult used Altera’s Arria 10 FPGAs to boost data centre power/performance.

Optimising wearable designs by integrating support circuitry

Systems on a Chip for wearable devices offer an astounding level of integration. Advanced manufacturing processes give SoC and MCU developers plenty of transistors to work with and these devices can integrate multicore processors, wireless connectivity, memory and graphics controllers.

High throughput, low power requirement

For cloud and IoT applications, there is a rising need for flexible GbE firewalls in corporate network infrastructures. With integrated Open Source and x86-based AMD Embedded G-Series SoCs, Deciso’s OPNsense firewall appliance offers double the flexibility. It enables high throughput with low power consumption making it suitable for both enterprise and IoT appliances.

Do engineers know what they like and like what they know?

Engineers can select from a range of technologies which might be appropriate for their next design. Options include ASICs, FPGAs and embedded CPUs. But there is a suspicion that, rather than selecting the platform which will be best for the job, engineers fall back on something with which they’re familiar.

The Desyre for change in SoC design

SoCs for critical applications could use 28% less energy and 48% less chip area while offering hardware failure rate nine times lower, if they were designed using the Desyre architecture, according to the European project. The result, the project adds, would reduce hospital costs and replacement rate of medical devices drastically.

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