Technology Filtered by - RF & Microwave

New Electronics strives to bring you all the latest technology news from the RF & Microwave sector. Advances in electronics are often fast-paced and innovative, so we know that as a design engineer you want to be kept up-to-date with current developments.

Below is a comprehensive list of all the latest electronics technology news from New Electronics.

Camera pill technology set to ease cancer diagnosis

Colonoscopies can be an uncomfortable procedure for patients who may already be worried about what the results may find. The process involves probing the large intestine with a tiny fibre optic camera, known as an endoscope, embedded in a 4ft long, flexible tube.

Virtual solution could spell the end for antennas

The fast pace of evolution of the wireless industry puts familiar time-to-market pressure on the engineering of every new mobile device. Being in the heart of every mobile product, the design of the RF front-end and, in particular, the antenna, becomes especially cumbersome - every product currently requires a fully customised antenna.

Modulation approach set to solve spectrum congestion

As mobile communications become more pervasive, the amount of data flowing around the various networks and – importantly, the various parts of the spectrum – grows inexorably. The world, it is claimed, is moving ever closer to spectrum congestion.

UK researchers in race to develop 5G technology

Mobile device users in the UK are about to be offered mouth watering deals to entice them to shift to faster data rate services as competition finally comes to the 4G market. 02 has just launched its LTE based (Long Term Evolution) services, while Vodafone and 3G UK – the other operators with 4G licences – will follow on shortly as they try to make up ground on Everything Everywhere, which was allowed to use its 1800MHz spectrum last October.

Forum puts the spotlight on rf innovation

RF and Wireless will take centre stage on 25 June 2013 at the Williams F1 centre near Oxford. It is the second of a series of forums that will conclude with a Power and Power Management event in October, and will be rolled out next year with six to nine events and different venues.

First things first: Don't leave placement of the antenna until the last moment

Demand for machine to machine communications – M2M – is growing rapidly and that is pushing more companies to include wireless functionality in their products. Colin Newman, sales and marketing director for antenna specialist Antenova, said: "Eighteen months ago, many products weren't wireless enabled. Today, companies are looking to include it. While some have technical knowledge, many of the companies we typically deal with have little rf expertise."

Maximising range and battery life in cost sensitive wireless networks

Given the high profile of 2.4GHz wireless standards such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, many manufacturers assume this is the de facto transceiver frequency. While this is true for some applications, many others have relatively low data rate requirements and operate within a closed wireless network. In these cases, a proprietary protocol can reduce system cost significantly.

Identifying new applications for rfid devices

The market for rf identification (rfid) devices is exploding. Active and passive tags are appearing in our cars, clothes, food packaging and luxury goods – even on our bodies – as well as being used throughout the manufacturing, processing, transport and logistics sectors.

Cutting cables: Demand for wireless links is on the increase

Cables are, in almost every application, yesterday's technology; if it isn't wireless, it's almost not worth considering. If you've decided that cables should go, what is the best solution for your product? There's a range of options available to design engineers, but one thing is certain: one size doesn't fit all.

60GHz band emerges as a complement to wifi

The emergence of smartphones and tablet computers alongside digital cameras, tvs and laptops means most interactions will soon be between devices, rather than between a device and the internet. Looking to enable these links, the Wireless Gigabit standard is being aimed as a broad interface that will support key computing and consumer electronics protocols without the need for cabling.

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