Automotive

Electronics is becoming increasingly important to the automotive sector, enabling the systems which we all expect to find in the latest cars. But those involved in the the sector, as well as those looking to enter the automotive supply chain, need to keep up to date.

New Electronics covers developments in the automotive sector, bringing technology updates and opinion from the market.

Affordable next generation clusters

Sophisticated graphics displays in the instrument cluster are a proven way for makers of premium vehicles to add consumer appeal and cachet to new high-end models of car. Audi has won rave reviews for its ‘Virtual Cockpit’ instrument cluster in the 2016 TT roadster.

Security risks in the connected world

To say the Internet of Things (IoT) is here to stay may be the understatement of the decade. We are all knee-deep in the IoT and there is no turning back – gone are the days of thinking connecting refrigerators, security systems and vending machines to the Internet is in a land far, far away.

Focusing light on industry’s problems

One of the longest established such centres in the UK, the Institute of Photonics at the University of Strathclyde is working in optogenetics and neurophotonics, as well as more traditional areas such as solid state lasers.

A move to brushless DC motors

Replacing mechanically driven motors with electrically commutated solutions doesn’t come without specific design considerations. In the automotive sector, the use of electric motors in applications such as power steering, cooling and fluid pumping, offers control, reliability and efficiency advantages over mechanical counterparts and it seems the automotive industry has yet to finish this transition. Market analysts report that more manufacturers are now choosing brushless DC motors (BLDCs) over brushed (internally commutated) electric motors, providing higher levels of control, reliability and efficiency.

Keeping compliant with all relevant EC Directives

A raft of new CE Marking Directives was implemented earlier in 2016. Amongst the nine new pieces of legislation was the third edition of the EMC Directive and new Low Voltage and ATEX Directives. Rather unusually, the changes to eight of the nine Directives were identical and furthermore the ninth contains the same changes as part of a wider overhaul. So why new the Directives and what are the implications for manufacturers?

What is the difference between FDM and Polyjet 3D printing technology?

Whether you’re buying your first 3D printer or upgrading from one you’ve been running for years, it's important to understand the differences between the two leading printing technologies. Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) and Polyjet each build 3D models layer by layer, but while the process by which they do this differs greatly, the one you choose to buy will likely be determined less by the technology itself than by the kind of models or tools you need for production.

A power limiter using a load switch

Constant current limiting circuits are commonplace, but sometimes a constant power limiting function is desired instead. This can be because downstream loads, like DC/DC converters, present a constant power load to their supply voltage, as delivered by the upstream converter. If the supply voltage to the DC/DC converter load exhibits significant tolerance, then a simple current limit may not deliver enough power to the load under all the voltage conditions. Setting a constant current limit to deliver the required power during a low supply voltage condition would result in greater power being demanded at the higher supply voltages during an overload condition. This article shows how to make an approximate constant power limiter.

Half-bridge motor drivers save time

A family of NovalithIC components from Infineon integrates the control chip and MOSFETs into a single component. Rutronik expects this to bring a new level of performance to integrated and protected motor drivers.

Catalyst brings together engineers and researchers in Northern Ireland

The Northern Ireland Science Park, recently rebranded Catalyst, brings together engineers and researchers to create a community of innovators. The Northern Ireland Science Park is seen by many as an unqualified success for the Northern Ireland economy. Recently rebranded Catalyst, new plans have been unveiled with the aim of investing a further£100million to drive innovation and technology to support growth in the region.

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