Latest In Depth Technology News

Helping rail power supplies to comply

Around the world brand new infrastructure projects are being rolled out – from the Naples to Bari high speed railway project in Italy and the proposed TEX rail project in Texas to London’s Crossrail/Elizabeth Line. As a result, demand for new rolling stock – whether for rail, suburban rail, metro or tram projects – is growing, with huge quantities of trains set to be built over the next few years.

Cooling atoms to almost absolute zero

Atoms generally whizz around with very high levels of energy – and it is this degree of activity that allows us to use the concept of temperature. When atoms have very low energy levels, they move much more slowly and we equate this to a very low temperature. Extrapolating, atoms stop moving at absolute zero.

Low cost solutions for managing enterprise content

Up to 80% of a company’s document information can be contained in different or separate formats – such as Word, Excel, pdf and AutoCAD – according to Jurate Venskeviciute-Buciene, chief marketing officer at DocLogix, a specialist in document and process management.

Graphene biosensors - finally a commercial reality

Nanomedical Diagnostics, a biotech company located in San Diego, California, has developed a breakthrough electronic assay, an investigative procedure that is usually used in medicine, pharmacology and molecular biology to assess or measure the presence of a particular entity.

High performance GUIs to improve wearable devices

High-end wearable devices such as smart watches are characterised by a rich functionality, a sophisticated graphical user interface (GUI) with touch operation and communication interfaces to a smartphone, tablet or PC – but also by extremely short battery life times.

Powerful telescopes bring us closer to the Big Bang

Humankind has always wondered what secrets the universe was hiding in its starry depths and striven to understand how we fit into the bigger picture. This curiosity is still strong, as demonstrated by the number of powerful telescopes that have either been built recently or are under construction.

Testing the Big Bang of smart devices

Imagine today’s typical test manager, awash in an alphabet soup of wireless protocols and sensors upon sensors. Thanks to the proliferation of smart devices in the Internet of Things (IoT), it’s a circumstance not unlike a star-filled sky, teeming with a dizzying mix of possibility and disorientation that is surely keeping organisational leaders up at night as they wonder what to do next.

Standards to unlock smart automotive potential

The automotive industry is going through some significant changes at the minute, with electric and connected vehicles already on the road. Meanwhile, autonomous vehicles are being tested across the globe and will, potentially, enter the mainstream in just a few years.

Pushing performance for VPX boards

FPGA technology has seen a significant change in the last two decades. From relatively simple devices used mainly as glue logic and for last minute board fixes, FPGAs have evolved into highly complex parts.

Is industry ready for 5G?

Just less than a month ago, the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, used his budget speech to make a case for 5G, the next-generation mobile technology, and promised to invest £16million in a series of trials and to support research into the development of technology to underpin its deployment.

Keeping operating areas MOSFET safe

Mission critical servers and communications equipment must continue to operate, even as circuit boards and cards are plugged-in or pulled-out for maintenance and capacity adjustment.

A shift in the distribution sector

Change is something which the distribution sector has dealt with regularly over the last two decades or so – whether it was the move from catalogues to the web or the acquisition of companies stuck in a ‘no man’s land’ between the big broadliners and the smaller specialists.

Automotive market to benefit from Industry 4.0

?The automotive segment is often considered to be associated solely with cars and related applications. It is, however, much bigger than that; encompassing a broad range of applications such as buses, trucks, industrial vehicles, mobile machinery, forklifts, automated cleaning machines and emergency vehicles.

Functional abstraction to help achieve digital continuity

Model-based approaches to electrical and electronic system design – usually based on UML derived languages such as SysML – are frequently not suited to agile, iterative architecture optimisation. But there is another approach; one that uses standardised, hierarchical function models combined on a single abstraction level to describe the technical content of system architecture.

Distributors adapt to a changing market

Distributors, whether global, regional or local, have been seen as essential when it comes to supplying and supporting engineers but, over the past five years, those needs have changed and there has been a significant shift in buying behaviours, all of which has impacted across the supply chain.

Helping customers determine what sensor they need

Different force-sensing technologies have been around for decades, but Apple’s decision to incorporate force touch into its products has raised the technology’s profile. Rather than interacting with our smartphones or notebooks using simple taps, we can now control them in different ways, depending on how hard we press. Force-sensing solutions enable device-makers and software developers to create much more natural, intuitive and immersive user experiences for those using their kit. However, measuring and using the analogue, non-linear output from force sensors is an entirely different animal than integrating capacitive sensing or traditional buttons, so it’s vital to have the tools in place to make force-sensing solution design and high-quality mass production as straightforward and as reliable as current technologies are. This article looks at some of these emerging use cases, and explain the characteristics that force sensors must have if they’re to deliver the desired performance, particularly in mid-range and high-end applications.

Oscilloscope manufacturers are looking to supply more intelligent probes as engineers seek greater measurement accuracy

Connecting a probe to a device under test can prove to be a time consuming activity, especially in the case of the increasingly complex devices that are now entering the market. While the ideal probe should offer ease of connection, convenience, absolute signal fidelity, zero signal source loading and complete noise immunity, there is currently no ideal probe size or configuration.

Revolutionising networking technology

The networking world has largely been defined by the development of fixed function chips. While these devices have been one of the means by which data rates have increased, this has been achieved at the expense of configurability.

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