Latest In Depth Technology News

Satellite data use is rapidly expanding

The UK is once more seen as a leading space science nation, with companies focused on making satellite technology more affordable through smaller, lighter-weight satellites that lower the cost of commercial launches. The Government’s continuing commitment to the industry was highlighted in the recent Queen’s Speech to Parliament, which included a space industry Bill outlining its ambition to grow the UK’s share of the global space market from 6.5% to 10% by 2030.

Solution to heat challenges in UV LED modules

Applications using ultraviolet (UV) light were first used back in the 1900s, but it was not until the 1940s that it was used on an industrial scale curing resins and inks and being deployed to sterilise and then disinfect medical equipment.

Analysing the energy storage challenge

Users of battery powered consumer electronic devices usually have one thing in mind; how long will it last before the battery needs to be recharged. Depending on the device and how it’s used, that could be less than a day.

A different approach to Big Data

In June 2013, Sir Mark Walport and Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell, co chairs of the Council for Science and Technology, sent a letter to then Prime Minister David Cameron entitled ‘The Age of Algorithms’. The letter contained eight recommendations, the sixth of which was the establishment of a National Centre to promote advanced research and translational work in algorithms and the application of data science. “This could fittingly be named the ‘Alan Turing Centre’,” they noted.

Industry associations' take on the Industrial Strategy White Paper

Despite the UK economy’s reliance on the financial and services sectors over the recent past, there remains an understanding that the development of technology has – and will continue to have – an important role to play. And if that technology can be translated into the creation of thriving companies, then all the better.

Making the impossible possible and the common easy

The rapid pace of technological advancement should be celebrated and embraced. It fuels amazing new technologies and scientific achievements that make us more connected and safer. It also pushes the limits of what we previously thought possible. The impact of these achievements is no longer isolated to a narrow market vertical. It permeates every industry and exposes the established market incumbents to an unusual combination of disruption and growth potential.

Machine learning to enable bug free chips

Two years ago, ARM decided to investigate the way in which its teams undertake hardware design. Using tools developed for cloud computing, the company now sifts through every result from the thousands of tests and simulations it runs on a daily basis in order to look for patterns.

Battery management systems for more reliable EVs and HVs

Lithium-ion batteries require considerable care if they are to operate reliably over a long period. Because they cannot be operated to the extreme end of their state of charge (SOC) and because their capacity diminishes and diverges over time and with use, every cell in a system must be managed to keep it within a constrained SOC.

Solutions at hand to test 3D-stacked IC technology

Research on 3D stacked IC (3D-SIC) technology has advanced to the point where most semiconductor companies have released or announced 3D-SIC products. These packages require multiple chip dies to be stacked vertically, which results in dense integration in an ultra-small footprint, but with benefits in terms of performance, power and cost.

Driving automation and connectivity innovation for smarter trucks

With the Google car and similar initiatives, almost all the focus in transportation is on self-driving cars. Trucks, however, could also benefit from extra automation and connectivity to enable preventive maintenance, improve safety, efficiency and cost. Might we therefore one day soon see trucks on our roads with no driver in the front seat?

Data infrastructure to make our cities 'smart'

Increasing urbanisation and growing populations mean that cities are growing at rate that many experts would say is ‘alarming’. Within a matter of just two or three years, 60% of the world’s population could be living in an urban environment, with all the challenges of energy and water supply, as well as delivering adequate transport and healthcare.

Getting a lock on small signals

Phase sensitive or lock-in amplifiers can extract low level signals in the presence of relatively high noise and, recently, there has been growing interest in their use in portable or embedded instrumentation and sensing applications.

Millimetre-wave technology key to future 5G applications

The availability of new mmWave frequency bands will be key to achieving the ambitious mobile data rate targets associated with 5G. But what are the likely operating bands or the technology and packaging options that will help to realise those essential mmWave components?

Academia expresses post Brexit concerns

Since the announcement in the Queen’s Speech to Parliament in May 2015 that a referendum would be held on the UK’s continuing membership of the European Union (EU), there have been considerable expressions of concern about the potential effect of a withdrawal on the country’s research and development efforts.

New and old tech required to develop space apps

Generally large and imposing, it can safely be assumed that satellites – such as Gaia, the Rosetta probe and the Hubble Telescope – required many thousands of hours of designing and testing; not least because of the harsh radiation and thermal conditions in space.

Europe's largest construction project: Crossrail

Work on Crossrail, or the Elizabeth Line, Europe’s largest construction project started eight years ago. A complex engineering project, it runs 100km from Reading and Heathrow in the west, underground across London to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east. The first rail services running through central London are due to start at the end of 2018 and, once complete, the new line is expected to be able to handle more than 200million passenger journeys a year.

Protect your instrumentation investment with software

For more than 50 years, test engineers have been taking a PC-based approach to automating stand-alone instrumentation. With so much investment tied up in capital assets for test equipment, engineers are looking for reassurance that they can satisfy current and future testing needs. While capital expenditure on hardware is often the easiest cost to associate with test, the importance of a good software investment is commonly overlooked. Instrumentation will continue to evolve, but one thing remains consistent over time – software. Software is at the heart of every instrument control system, and it can help you future proof your application.

How to cope with data intensive IoT applications

The downstream performance requirements of SaaS and streaming services are increasing constantly. The same goes for upstream workloads, which are rising dramatically as a result of IoT applications with voice control or with tens of thousands of vision sensors.

Changes in the test and measurement market

With enormous change in the types of product coming to market and the way in which they are being designed, it is obvious that those companies that deliver test and measurement equipment are also having to adapt.

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Most popular