Latest In Depth Technology News

New Electronics brings you a selection of in depth Technology Articles, covering key issues and innovations within research & development, embedded design, power, communications design, test & measurement, programmable logic, system design and more.

Evolution of real-time applications calls for novel memory technologies

We are now beginning to see the emergence of a range of technologies that will lead to major changes in the design of real-time embedded systems. These technologies include the Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence (AI) and augmented reality (AR). The unifying thread between all of them is a greater focus on the use of distributed systems coupled with a need for high performance to deal with the data they generate and consume.

Low cost sensors will help the IoT to be realised

The Internet of Things is developing from being a concept just a few years ago to something far more tangible. But the whole idea of the IoT is dependent upon collecting masses of data from billions of so called edge devices, analysing it and deciding on actions. That data needs to be collected by sensors of all description – and those sensors need to be low cost if the aims of those creating products for the IoT are to be realised.

Industrial digitalisation made real

Last month saw the publication of the Industrial Digitalisation Review which outlined a series of proposals to boost the UK’s economy through the deployment of advanced digital technologies including: robotics, 3D printing, augmented and virtual reality and artificial intelligence.

The Sonic Internet

Whether in the smart home or in in-car entertainment the audio market is changing rapidly. The audio industry is enjoying a sustained period of rapid growth, particularly in key audio markets like the US and UK, and audio is becoming more important as developers look to create more immersive experiences in the fields of gaming and virtual reality.

Crystals expose hidden personalities

At the turn of the 19th Century, Friedrich Heusler was surprised to find he could unlock the magnetism inside the distinctly non-magnetic metals copper, manganese and tin by combining them.

Birmingham University is pioneering VR, AR, simulation and telerobotics systems

Established in 2003 by Professor Bob Stone, Birmingham University’s Human Interface Technologies (HIT) Team, based within the university’s School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (EESE) has been a pioneer in the development of interactive media and telerobotic technologies in the UK, building on Stone’s long experience in virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), mixed reality, simulation and telerobotics.

The changing face of customer engagement

The trends that have been affecting the electronics industry over the past few years are on-going and continuing to impact on distributors, whether that’s technology drivers, mergers and acquisitions among OEMs or customers relying more heavily on distributors to pick up the slack, as they look to cut back on their own direct sales and marketing capabilities.

RS-485 transceivers need protection against large over-voltages

Robustness and reliability have made RS-485 an industrial workhorse. A minimum differential signal swing of 1.5V and reliable operation over common-mode voltages ranging from -7V to +12V have catapulted its deployment. Initially used as a communication network in laboratory instrumentation, RS-485 can be found in applications ranging from building automation to traffic monitoring systems.

AI faces a power struggle if it is to be used more broadly

It is easy to see artificial intelligence (AI) as a naturally power-hungry technology; it demands racks of servers stuffed with a combination of multicore CPUs, GPUs and, increasingly, FPGAs that crunch through terabytes of data to form the connections between millions of virtual neurons.

The NPL is looking to prove that measurement matters

The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) was established in 1900 with the aim of bringing ‘scientific knowledge to bear practically upon our everyday industrial and commercial life’ and, over the past 117 years, it has established itself as a world class centre of excellence in measurement science. Not only that it has maintained the nation’s primary standards of measurement while developing and contributing to a host of innovations and technologies, from radar to atomic clocks.

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