Latest In Depth Technology News

New Electronics brings you a selection of in depth Technology Articles, covering key issues and innovations within research & development, embedded design, power, communications design, test & measurement, programmable logic, system design and more.

The blockchain buzz

Blockchain is the technology behind cryptocurrency, but many have suggested it as a new way to approach security. Bethan Grylls looks at whether there’s any substance behind the hype.

How to choose a medical power supply

The IEC60601-1 medical equipment safety standard is not the only factor that distinguishes medical-grade power supplies from commercial models. Life cycles, enhanced design support, quality systems and second source strategy all play a part. This white paper goes beyond the volts, amps and safety approval factors to provide some design considerations to make it easier for you to select the right medical power supply.

Bringing AI to the edge

Artificial intelligence (AI) has kindled the imagination of computer scientists for decades and while the ambition and enthusiasm around AI has tended to clash with the complexity of the task, today’s computational power has risen exponentially and the ambition of general AI has been curbed sufficiently to match that power.

Loose threads

Timing can be tricky in embedded systems. Shortly after it touched down on the surface of Mars in 1997, NASA’s Pathfinder lander started to malfunction, triggering a watchdog timer that engineers tried to fix with system resets.

Making parking painless

At a time when the pressure on Britain’s roads and transport systems has never been more intense, with congestion at an all-time high, a US business is bringing a new parking platform to the UK in a bid to improve traffic management.

Spotless not clueless

Once regarded as a purely mechanical industry, the automotive sector has entered an electronic era as a result of increasing demand for electric vehicles, infotainment systems and driver assistance features.

Digital dilemma

As the amount of data soars and computational power accelerates, data centres are set to have a bigger carbon footprint than the aviation industry. What can be done to address this?

Laying the foundations for the future

The LED lighting industry is contributing to the adoption of IoT for building communications and controls. Smart lighting systems coming to market supporting two-way communications are helping to revolutionise the convergence of building and lighting control, using the same infrastructure extensible to support the IoT and to manage other building systems.

Break the stereotype

The gender gap is closing. Around 11% of the engineering workforce is female – that is a 2% rise from 2015 figures, according to the Women’s Engineering Society. It’s great to see that more women are deciding to enter into STEM, but it’s a slow journey.

IIot collaboration

A new industry collaboration looks to deliver wireless communication solutions suitable for industrial and commercial IoT markets.

Can a transient effect rescue silicon power scaling?

The war with semiconductor physics claimed another victim at the end of August when GlobalFoundries decided it could no longer afford to continue work on a 7nm finFET process, or its successors, despite the efforts of teams that came originally from AMD and IBM. With deeper pockets, Intel, Samsung and TSMC are continuing but at some point even they will either run out of nanometres or the belief that they will find enough customers to pay for increasingly expensive wafers that may not justify the scaling benefit they achieve.

Will the attractions of embedded FPGA overcome traditional cost objections and finally see accelerated growth?

Twenty years ago, it looked like a concept that was ready for primetime: putting programmable logic inside ASICs and SoCs. At the time, the move seemed inevitable. ASIC mask prices were rising fast, driven by the need to pull more and more from a bag of optical tricks to keep Moore’s Law on track. The cost of respins alone seemed enough to persuade designers to leave some reprogrammable “sewing kits” in their SoCs to let them iron out bugs after tapeout instead of committing tens of thousands of dollars more to the project to get some new masks.

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