comment on this article

Wireless, battery-free, biodegradable blood flow sensor

Artist's depiction of the biodegradable pressure sensor wrapped around a blood vessel with the antenna off to the side (layers separated to show details of the antenna's structure)

A device developed by Stanford University researchers that monitors the flow of blood through an artery could make it easier for doctors to monitor the success of blood vessel surgery.

The biodegradable, battery-free and wireless sensor is compact and doesn't need to be removed, and it can warn a patient's doctor if there is a blockage.

"Measurement of blood flow is critical in many medical specialties, so a wireless biodegradable sensor could impact multiple fields including vascular, transplant, reconstructive and cardiac surgery," said Paige Fox, assistant professor of surgery and co-senior author of the paper.

Monitoring the success of surgery on blood vessels is challenging as the first sign of trouble often comes too late. By that time, the patient often needs additional surgery that carries risks similar to the original procedure. This new sensor could let doctors keep tabs on a healing vessel from afar, creating opportunities for earlier interventions.

The sensor wraps snugly around the healing vessel, where blood pulsing past pushes on its inner surface. As the shape of that surface changes, it alters the sensor's capacity to store electric charge, which doctors can detect remotely from a device located near the skin but outside the body. That device solicits a reading by pinging the antenna of the sensor, similar to an ID card scanner. In the future, this device could come in the form of a stick-on patch or be integrated into other technology, like a wearable device or smartphone, added the research team.

The researchers first tested the sensor in an artificial setting where they pumped air through an artery-sized tube to mimic pulsing blood flow. Surgeon Yukitoshi Kaizawa, a former postdoctoral scholar at Stanford and co-author of the paper, also implanted the sensor around an artery in a rat. Even at such a small scale, the sensor successfully reported blood flow to the wireless reader. At this point, they were only interested in detecting complete blockages, but they did see indications that future versions of this sensor could identify finer fluctuations of blood flow.

The sensor is a wireless version of technology that the K. K. Lee Professor in the School of Engineering and co-senior author of the paper Zhenan Bao has been developing in order to give prostheses a delicate sense of touch.

The researchers had to modify their existing sensor's materials to make it sensitive to pulsing blood but rigid enough to hold its shape. They also had to move the antenna to a location where it would be secure, not affected by the pulsation, and re-design the capacitor so it could be placed around an artery.

The researchers are now finding the best way to affix the sensors to the vessels and refining their sensitivity. They are also looking forward to what other ideas will come as interest grows in this interdisciplinary area.

Author
Bethan Grylls

Comment on this article


This material is protected by MA Business copyright See Terms and Conditions. One-off usage is permitted but bulk copying is not. For multiple copies contact the sales team.

What you think about this article:


Add your comments

Name
 
Email
 
Comments
 

Your comments/feedback may be edited prior to publishing. Not all entries will be published.
Please view our Terms and Conditions before leaving a comment.

Related Articles

Fault detector

A tool that is able to spot defects or unwanted features much earlier in the ...

On-chip optical link

For the first time, researchers of the University of Twente (UT) succeeded in ...

Definition in demand

Consumer interest in 4K continues to increase and by the end of 2018 4K TV ...

Managing your IPR

It’s essential that companies consider managing their intellectual property ...

Where next in 2019?

From the first autonomous vehicles to 5G and the realisation of mobile AR ...

Dual-Radio dev kit

By supporting concurrent communication over Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and ...

Smart Home Expo

The Smart Home Expo, which focuses on the future of smart technologies, ...

Get to market faster

A quick look at using Vicor's PFM and AIM in VIA packaging for your AC to Point ...

Storm clouds gather

The latest quarterly report from the EEF, the manufacturers’ organisation, ...

Dangerously dodgy IT

Matt Hancock, the Secretary of State for Health, has announced a £200million ...

Planning pays off

Described as a one-stop shop Plexus provides companies with engineering, ...

Piezoelectric haptics

Boréas Technologies’ CEO, Simon Chaput, talks to Neil Tyler about the company’s ...