comment on this article

TI donates Fairchild notebooks to Computer History Museum

from the left, Paula Jabloner, director of collections for Computer History Museum, David Laws, semiconductor curator for the Computer History Museum, and Joan Scott, director of community relations for Texas Instruments in Silicon Valley.

Texas Instruments has donated archive material – including more than 1000 engineering notebooks kept by such legends as Bob Noyce and Gordon Moore – to the US Computer History Museum. The notebooks were part of a donation of more than 115 boxes of historical records.


TI acquired the documents in 2011 when it purchased National Semiconductor, which had owned them since it bought Fairchild in 1987.
John Hollar, the Museum's president, said: "These rare, historic notebooks contain the work that paved the way for 'Moore's Law', the explosive growth of electronic computing and the foundation of the switched on world we live in today. We are proud to ensure they will be preserved for and presented to future generations, and we are enormously grateful to TI for its generosity and vision in making this gift."
The notebooks are said to represent an almost day by day account of the work done by Fairchild staff to develop planar technology in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Dag Spicer, the Museum's senior curator, added: "These notebooks describe the painstaking and creative approach Fairchild scientists and engineers took to solving problems in semiconductor design and manufacture. They are cultural treasures that record a true inflection point in human history."
Seen at the handover ceremony are, from the left, Paula Jabloner, director of collections for Computer History Museum, David Laws, semiconductor curator for the Computer History Museum, and Joan Scott, director of community relations for Texas Instruments in Silicon Valley.

Author
Graham Pitcher

Comment on this article


This material is protected by MA Business copyright See Terms and Conditions. One-off usage is permitted but bulk copying is not. For multiple copies contact the sales team.

What you think about this article:


Add your comments

Name
 
Email
 
Comments
 

Your comments/feedback may be edited prior to publishing. Not all entries will be published.
Please view our Terms and Conditions before leaving a comment.

Related Articles

Always innovating

Check out this brief video promo for an all new website that explores TI ...

Mobile slowdown

With just under a week to go before Apple launches its new iPhone the press has ...

Broadband upgrade

BT has made an offer to the government to spend £600million to deliver 10Mbps ...

The big build

It’s fair to say that politicians, with a few noticeable exceptions, have never ...

Hitting maturity?

From curved TVs to pop-up presentation screens a new wave of products are ...

A man with a plan

Cypress Semiconductor was formed in 1982 and went public in 1986. Until 2016, ...