08 June 2012

Tactus Technology debuts touchscreen interface with appearing and disappearing keys

Californian start up Tactus Technology has developed and patented a next generation haptic user interface with real physical buttons that rise out of the surface of any touchscreen and then recede to invisibility.

The Tactus Tactile Layer panel is said to be the world's first deformable tactile surface that creates dynamic physical buttons that users can actually see and feel in advance of entering data into the device. It utilises innovative microfluidic technology to create physical buttons that rise from the touchscreen to give users the experience of operating a physical keyboard. When no longer needed, the buttons recede back into the touchscreen, leaving no trace of their presence.

The Tactile Layer panel is a completely flat, transparent, dynamic surface that adds no extra thickness to the standard touchscreen display since it replaces a layer of the already existing display stack. According to the company, it enables manufacturers to create devices with entirely new ergonomics and form factors, since the screen and the keyboard can now be combined.

When triggered, the thin layer deforms and buttons or shapes of a specific height, size and firmness appear on the surface of the screen. Users can feel, press down and interact with these physical buttons just like they would use keys on a keyboard. The buttons recede into the surface and become invisible when they are no longer needed.

The technology is targeted at devices including tablets, eBook readers, medical devices, automotive displays, industrial controls, test equipment, gaming devices.

Author
Laura Hopperton

Supporting Information

Websites
http://www.tactustechnology.com/

This material is protected by Findlay Media copyright
See Terms and Conditions.
One-off usage is permitted but bulk copying is not.
For multiple copies contact the sales team.

Do you have any comments about this article?


Add your comments

Name
 
Email
 
Comments
 

Your comments/feedback may be edited prior to publishing. Not all entries will be published.
Please view our Terms and Conditions before leaving a comment.

Related Articles

Amp works at 50% efficiency

Researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Cardiff have created an ...

Materials breakthrough

A technique to study the interface between materials, developed at the National ...

Quantum logic gate created

Professor Gerhard Rempe, director of the Max Planck Institute of Quantum ...

Down to the wire

Once the plain old telephone service, the role of the telephone wire continues ...

LED bulb 'achieves impossible'

"It was a technical challenge to make 50 units that met a certain ...

Boosting LED performance

Energy efficiency and longevity have made LEDs the light source of choice in a ...

NI Trend Watch 2014

This report from National Instruments summarises the latest trends in the ...

Video wall technology

Video wall technology is changing the industrial landscape and the way we see ...

Optimising operating life

The replacement of incandescent lighting mandated by the largest countries ...

Buck LED driver

A dimmable buck LED driver, designed to reduce component count and PCB size in ...

High resolution display module

A new display from Demmel Products has introduced high definition to a smaller ...

Customised ePaper displays

Electronic Assembly's ePaper displays are designed for use in the medical, ...

RF & Wireless forum

9th September 2014, Manchester, UK

BEEAs 2013

9th October 2014, 8 Northumberland, London

Self-destructing electronics

Researchers at Iowa State University have created transient electronics that ...

MEMS switch for 'true 4G'

General Electric has created a 3GHz RF MEMS switch that can handle up to 5kW of ...

LED lighting lamp designs

TI marketing engineer, John Perry discusses how the new TPS92411 Floating ...

Electronic charge to 800mph

Breaking the land speed record would require a very special blend of latest ...

Flash drives semi technologies

Demand for NAND flash is said to be growing at 45% per year, driven mainly by ...

Nothing to wear?

The term 'wearable electronics' has a range of interpretations. At one end of ...

Nathan Hill, director, NGI

Research into graphene won Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov the Nobel prize in ...

Brent Hudson, Sagentia

Sagentia's ceo tells Graham Pitcher how the consulting company is anticipating ...

Prof Donal Bradley, Imperial

Graham Pitcher talks to a researcher who was 'there at the start' of the ...