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SmartEverything board simplifies gesture, sound, vibration recognition

Arrow Electronics has extended its range of IoT development boards with the addition of the SmartEverything Panther.

The board has been designed to enable users to add pattern recognition capabilities to their products quickly allowing them to recognise gestures, sound and vibration patterns and then to link them to the cloud via Wi-Fi for monitoring and control purposes.

The SmartEverything boards are based on the Arduino form factor and incorporate a variety of I/O interfaces and sensors together with wireless connectivity. They are intended to help developers and accelerate IoT projects and to get products up and running quickly.

The Panther board is intended to speed up the development of IoT applications based on Intel Pattern Matching Technology. Its base board features an Intel Quark SE C1000 MCU sensing engine with 8Mbyte Winbond flash memory and a Linear Technology battery management chip. A Cypress Bluetooth LE module allows interface setting and firmware upgrade and a Microchip Wi-Fi solution provides access to the Internet. Security is delivered through Microchip’s crypto authentication.

A companion shield for the base board contains an array of sensor functions including gesture sensor (Silicon Labs), temperature/humidity/pressure sensor (Bosch), digital microphone (ST Microelectronics), and gyroscope and accelerometer (Analog Devices).

The SmartEverything Panther also looks to leverage Intel’s software infrastructure including the QMSI driver library and Zephyr open source low footprint RTOS, which is specifically designed for connected, resource-constrained devices in applications such as IoT. The RTOS runs on both the Quark MCU and the sensor subsystem. An Eclipse-based integrated development environment supports the efficient creation of fast and compact code.

Arrow Connect, part of Arrow’s IoT software suite can help to manage device connectivity to the Cloud and greatly simplifies the process where multiple protocols are being used.

Author
Neil Tyler

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