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AMD launches R series and targets graphics intensive applications

AMD's R series

AMD has extended its embedded systems product range with the announcement of the R series platform; industrialised versions of Trinity, the recently launched general computing processor.

According to Cameron Swen, AMD's worldwide marketing manager for the R series, the devices are more accurately called accelerated processing units, or apus. "We've taken leading edge x86 and graphics technology to create an apu on a single piece of silicon. We're calling it 'accelerated' because it's more than the sum of a cpu plus graphics."
There will be eight devices in the R series, with dual and quad core parts available in a choice of two packages. All are based on Piledriver, the second generation of AMD's Bulldozer core. According to the company, R series parts will combine the power of its cpu technologies with what it calls 'discrete class' graphics. R series parts can feature up to 384 parallel compute units.
"Embedded designers are driving to get as much power/performance as possible for the lowest cost," Swen pointed out. "These devices will benefit a range of applications, particularly with the ability to support four displays." Swen noted medical imaging and digital signage as potential applications.
While the devices can run at up to 3GHz, Swen says the R series is not all about performance. "Designers also need reliability and security, which we're providing through the DAS 1.0 features."
The R series will complement the G series, which targets low power, but graphics intensive, applications. "R series takes things to the next level," Swen enthused, "and will offer scalability for graphics."
While the G series has a thermal design power (TDP) of 5 to 18W, R series parts will range from 17 to 35W. "But that's the high point of consumption," Swen claimed. "Average consumption will be more like 13W."

Graham Pitcher

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AMD (UK) Ltd

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