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Google's Nexus 7 tablet powered by Nvidia Tegra 3

Nvidia Tegra 3 drives Google’s Nexus 7 tablet

Google has today unveiled its highly anticipated 7in media tablet, which will run on the newest version of Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean).

The Nexus 7 features a Nvidia Tegra 3 chip set, including a quad core cpu and a 12 core gpu, along with a 1280 x 800 hd display. It also integrates NXP Semiconductors' PN65 NFC solution, featuring an NFC radio controller and an embedded Secure Element.

According to NXP, the chip set enables Android Beam and Bluetooth pairing and lets mobile users share contact information, web pages, videos, and directions just by tapping two NFC enabled devices together.

Driving Nexus 7 is the Tegra 3 processor, which features a 4-PLUS-1 quad core architecture for extended battery life. Tegra 3's fifth battery saver core is designed for use in everyday functions like email, social updates, watching films and playing music, while each of the Tegra 3's four main cpu cores progressively power on only as needed for tasks like gaming.

According to Google, the Nexus 7 offers up to eight hours of hd video playback, 10 hours book reading, 10 hours web browsing and 300 hours standby.

"Nexus 7 with Tegra 3 delivers a premium experience at a price consumers will absolutely love," said Michael Rayfield, general manager of the Mobile business at Nvidia. "We're thrilled to work with Google as they create an innovative device that redefines the tablet market with quad core performance, great battery life and the best of Google."

Running Jelly Bean, Nexus 7 features a 7in IPS screen, comes with either 8 or 16GB of storage, 1GB RAM, a front camera, a micro usb port and access to more than 600,000 apps. It is expected to be available in mid July in the US starting at $199.

Author
Laura Hopperton

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