comment on this article

Flexible electronics technology could lead to new medical devices

Flexible electronics technology could lead to new medical devices. Image courtesy of Wayne State University
Flexible electronics technology could lead to new medical devices. Image courtesy of Wayne State University

A US researcher has developed a flexible electronics technology compatible with SOI cmos processes which could open up new possibilities for medical devices.

Yong Xu, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Wayne State University, says his technology offers an advantage over existing approaches such as transfer printing.

The method fabricates cmos circuits onto SOI wafers, and then uses two layers of polymer Parylene C, one of which is perforated, to bond them to flexible substrates.

This allows more electronic devices to be attached to the flexible surface by eliminating the transfer printing step, in which electronics are removed from a harder surface and integrated into a softer one. The process also allows sensors and microfluidic devices to be integrated into the flexible substrate.

The lamination of the electronics between the parylene layers also offers the benefit of protection from environmental moisture. Parylene C has been used in other medical applications and is said to be well tolerated by human tissue.

"The ultimate goal is to develop flexible and stretchable systems integrated with electronics, sensors, microfluidics, and power sources, which will have a profound impact on personalised medicine, telemedicine and health care delivery," Xu commented.

Author
Simon Fogg

Comment on this article


This material is protected by Findlay Media copyright See Terms and Conditions. One-off usage is permitted but bulk copying is not. For multiple copies contact the sales team.

Enjoy this story? People who read this article also read...

What you think about this article:


Add your comments

Name
 
Email
 
Comments
 

Your comments/feedback may be edited prior to publishing. Not all entries will be published.
Please view our Terms and Conditions before leaving a comment.

Related Articles

Pushing ahead to 7nm

The semiconductor manufacturing sector's mission to conform to the demands of ...

NI Trend Watch 2014

This report from National Instruments summarises the latest trends in the ...

Capactive sensing

This whitepaper looks at a number of capacitive sensing applications to ...

ES LIVE 2015

Taking place on 14th May at the Madejski Stadium in Reading, Electronics ...

MENE 2015

Manufacturing & Engineering North East is a completely new type of event aimed ...

Real time DLP

Demonstration of DLP Hyperspectral Imaging on a kidney and the benefits the ...

Better batteries

For much of the last Century, battery technology didn't really need to ...

The tale of the tape

Data storage, at least at the consumer end of the scale, is dominated by flash ...