comment on this article

Curving technology proposed for optical equipment

Leti, a research institute at CEA Tech, has developed a new curving technology for optical sensors and micro-displays that improves performance, enhances field of view and compensates for aberrations in optical applications.

According to a newly published scientific paper, the technology is able to curve components such as CMOS imagers and charged-couple device (CCD) imagers for a broad range of products such as mobile phones, cameras, telescopes, medical-imaging tools and industrial-control equipment.

Other uses include IR sensors for astronomy, defence, drones and micro-displays for automotive applications, augmented reality and virtual reality.

Leti has developed a fully functional prototype of this technology and unveiled its work in a paper, “Curved Sensors for Compact High-Resolution Wide Field Designs: Prototype Demonstration and Optical Characterization”, at Photonics West 2018, in collaboration with LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille).

“Curved sensor technology is a disruptive approach for imaging applications such as photography, videography, computer vision, surveillance and many other applications,” said Bertrand Chambion, one of the paper’s co-authors. “In recent years, we have seen very strong interest in curved electronics, particularly for opto-electronics systems whose performance improves, while size, complexity and cost are reduced.”

The demonstration comprises of a 1/1.8’’ format, 1.3-million-pixel CMOS image sensor. The standard sensor structure consists of a 7.74 x 8.12mm silicon die glued on a ceramic package. Electrical connections are wire bonded from the die to the package surface and, then, to the interconnection board. A glass cover is placed on top for mechanical protection.

Leti uses a grinding process to get the sensor below 100µm thick, which makes it mechanically flexible. It is then glued onto a curved substrate, which determines its final shape. A wire bonding process developed for electrical connections is used to prevent damages on the thinned dies. The radius of curvature is R=65mm.

The process is, according to the paper’s authors, compatible with any sensor size and with large-scale manufacturing processes.

Author
Neil Tyler

Comment on this article


This material is protected by MA Business copyright See Terms and Conditions. One-off usage is permitted but bulk copying is not. For multiple copies contact the sales team.

What you think about this article:


Add your comments

Name
 
Email
 
Comments
 

Your comments/feedback may be edited prior to publishing. Not all entries will be published.
Please view our Terms and Conditions before leaving a comment.

Related Articles

Fault detector

A tool that is able to spot defects or unwanted features much earlier in the ...

On-chip optical link

For the first time, researchers of the University of Twente (UT) succeeded in ...

Definition in demand

Consumer interest in 4K continues to increase and by the end of 2018 4K TV ...

Managing your IPR

It’s essential that companies consider managing their intellectual property ...

Dual-Radio dev kit

By supporting concurrent communication over Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and ...

Smart Home Expo

The Smart Home Expo, which focuses on the future of smart technologies, ...

Get to market faster

A quick look at using Vicor's PFM and AIM in VIA packaging for your AC to Point ...

Semiconductor boom

Compared to an ailing steel industry, just a few years ago, the semiconductor ...

Sourcing components

Since the launch of the Model 3, Elon Musk has been under significant pressure ...

Planning pays off

Described as a one-stop shop Plexus provides companies with engineering, ...

Piezoelectric haptics

Boréas Technologies’ CEO, Simon Chaput, talks to Neil Tyler about the company’s ...