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Whether it's comment on a recent story, a slightly irreverent look at the latest news or an expression of complete disbelief, New Electronics' editorial team brings you its views on the latest from the electronics industry, putting these developments into context.

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Intel ‘blinks’ as it claims processor road map is ‘inadequate’

ARM processors were once used primarily in mobile phones. Intel's processors, meanwhile, powered pretty much every pc. Then the world changed; smartphones appeared, tablet computers started to be developed and industry began to focus more closely on energy efficiency. Users needed different kinds of processor. ARM had seen this coming and developed a range of cores under the Cortex umbrella. The A, M and R families – aimed at applications, microcontrollers and real time, respectively – became attractive to a wider range of applications.

O2 problems show the need for more network security

When the mobile phone goes down, it can be a blessing. But it can also be a curse, particularly if the mobile is your main communication device. And it must be particularly galling if you're coughing up £45 a month for all the features and benefits of an iPhone, only to find yourself cut off from the world.

NXP technology enables light bulbs to be turned on via web

In the latest incarnation of the 'internet enabled fridge', NXP has announced technology that can be integrated into the base of an energy efficient light bulb. Not only does this technology offer dimming abilities, it will also allow light bulbs to be turned on and off over the web.

Will EDA360 help catch up with hardware/software codesign challenges?

It's nearly a year since Cadence launched its EDA360 initiative, described at the time as a 'new vision' for the eda world. EDA360 was created as a way to expand the eda market beyond its traditional boundaries, growing it from today's $5billion a year to what Cadence's chief marketing officer John Bruggeman called a 'crazy growth' market worth $25bn a year. Big goals.

Can the electronics industry ever match supply and demand?

Semiconductor manufacturing encompasses two wildly differing approaches. At one extreme, there is the need for absolute precision when building devices with feature sizes of 40nm and smaller. At the other extreme is the wild imprecision of building manufacturing capacity – balancing supply and demand.

Who holds all the cards?

Apple has filed a lawsuit against Samsung, claiming the South Korean electronics giant has copied the design of its iPhone and iPad for the Galaxy S 4G, Epic 4G, Nexus S and Galaxy Tab.

Ifs, buts and maybes

When Gordon Moore developed his eponymous law in the heady days of the 1960s, he focused only on the number of transistors that could be accommodated on a given area of silicon.

TI, National Semiconductor takeover analysis

It's been a while since there has been a takeover on the scale of that involving Texas Instruments and National Semiconductor. Apart from the cost – $6.5billion – there's a substantial amount of products and an awful lot of people to be dealt with, not to mention production facilities.

Trepidation as Sony reveals U.K. plans

With the burgeoning television market now offering consumers thinner, wider and sleeker devices than ever before, it's clear to see the days of bulky black and white televisions are now a thing of the past.

Can I see your ID please...

I was in our local off licence a few weeks back, picking up the mandatory supplies for what turned out to be, thankfully, a successful New Year's Eve party.

Aftershocks

The electronics industry anticipates a period of component shortages and price hikes.

The heat's on to get the power down in the microserver market

Server farms and data centres are 'out there' somewhere. But if it wasn't for them, we'd have no internet, no online shopping and no cloud computing. As demand for bandwidth continues to grow, the number of data centres needed to satisfy demand increases. But providing bandwidth and the instant access to data and services that we crave needs more and more data centres – and they consume huge amounts of energy.

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